NASA announces launch date for new target

NASA announced Wednesday that it will roll an Artemis I SLS lunar rocket back onto the platform for another launch attempt next month, first it was a rocket engine sensor, then a hydrogen leak and then Hurricane Ian. But NASA is now moving forward for its next launch attempt on November 14, just after midnight. The SLS stack was pushed back into the Vehicle Assembly Building before Ian hit the head and this gave the launch teams time to cover their bases. It will be about another month before we actually start launching. It’s very important to charge the batteries and make sure everything is ready to get past the leakage issues they’ve had,” said Don Platt of Florida Tech. The rocket has been stacked for over a year and has been on platform 39B for about seven weeks — since this is the first time it has flown The SLS rocket stack, there will be no astronauts on board, but there will be mannequins with sensors to detect the influence of forces and the environment, and NASA engineers are confident that the problems that kept the SLS stack on Earth have been fixed and that minimal work is needed to get it ready to fly, but unlike previous launch attempts, this next one will be at night which isn’t ideal because NASA wants to view every angle of the SLS launch for the first time. In November — it was more important than losing any camera data they might have,” Platt said. NASA officials said the 322-foot rocket wouldn’t back off before November 4. “I think it would be interesting if they called the VP down this time,” said Eric Berger of Ars Technica if the SLS performs and the countdown goes as it is. Planned for November 14, the mission will last 25 days.This is shorter than the 40-day mission if it was launched in previous attempts, and if the SLS rocket was not launched on November 14, there are two backup dates of November 16 and 19.

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NASA announced Wednesday that it will roll an Artemis I SLS lunar rocket back onto the platform for another launch attempt next month.

First it was the rocket engine sensor, then the hydrogen leak and then Hurricane Ian. But NASA is now moving forward for its next launch attempt on November 14 after midnight.

The SLS stack was pushed back into the Vehicle Assembly Building before Ian hits the head giving the launch teams time to cover their bases.

“It will be about another month before we really start to launch. It’s very important to charge the batteries and make sure everything is ready to move past the leaking issues they had,” said Don Platt of Florida Tech.

The rocket was stacked over a year ago and has been in platform 39B for about seven weeks.

Since this is the first time the stack of SLS rockets has flown, there will be no astronauts on board. But there will be models equipped with sensors to detect the influence of forces and the environment.

NASA engineers are confident that the problems that kept the SLS stack on Earth have been fixed and that minimal work is needed to get it ready for flight.

But unlike previous launch attempts, this next one will be at night which isn’t ideal because NASA wants to view every angle of the SLS launch for the first time.

“They might have done a risk-benefit analysis and decided that a nightly launch — and doing it now, in November — was more important than losing any camera data they might have,” Platt said.

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NASA officials said the 322-foot-long rocket wouldn’t back off before November 4.

“I think it would be interesting if they invite the vice president this time around. This will give us some indication of their confidence on the way to the next attempt,” said Eric Berger of Ars Technica.

If the SLS is implemented and the countdown begins as planned on November 14, the mission will last 25 days. This is shorter than the 40+ day mission if launched in previous attempts.

And if the SLS does not launch on November 14, then there are two backup dates of November 16 and 19.

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